Your ‘Escape’, Their ‘Misery’-Thoughts on a Pre-Trib Rapture

May 9th, 2011 by

I find many Christians who support the restoration of the Jewish people to their homeland in Israel also subscribe to the end-time teaching known as the pre-tribulation rapture.  This teaching holds that Jesus will return first as a “thief in the night” to snatch away the Church prior to a hellish reign of terror by a false messiah in the last days. He will then come again with His Church to destroy all satanic rule on this planet and establish the long-awaited Messianic Age.
But have these Christians who hold this view stopped to consider, as I finally did, that this teaching is fundamentally opposed to the heart and soul of Christian Zionism?

I do not know how many of our readers have had the same experience, but I certainly have.  Now it must be stated that any position on theology must be based in scripture first and foremost.  Although spending most of my formative years in a Scofield Bible, within the first year of college I had abandoned Dispensationalism based on a  different look at the texts in the Bible.  But at this point in my life, I was not able to see some of the implications of my beliefs and their impact on the connection to Israel.  Brian Hennessy continues on with his own experience

It didn’t take long to see where the problem lay. At almost every pro-Israel event there would be a time of public repentance for turning our backs – and often our weapons – on the Jews over the centuries. We’d loudly proclaim that “we will never abandon you again.” Either by keeping silent in times of persecution, as so many did during the Holocaust. Or by doctrinally distancing ourselves again through the acceptance of Replacement Theology.

Yet by embracing a rapture theology, aren’t we already planning to abandon them again? And at a time when Israel and the Jews will need us the most? Worse, we crow about our “saving event” without a blush or a word of apology to our Jewish friends. What must the Jews think? No doubt they are grateful for our present support, but I’m sure they won’t be holding their breath waiting for us to show up once the feathers hit the fan. What is wrong with us? Have we learned nothing from our past betrayals of our brothers? Are we just going to be happy-clappy cheerleaders for the State of Israel as long as the skies are sunny? But when dark clouds come will we quickly start looking for the rapture bus to get us out of here – fast?

 

Those are sobering words.  It is a functional disconnect between theology and relationship.  I have said this in conversations with other believers that a “pre-tribulation rapture is anti-Semitic.”  Now, those are strictly my words and this observation took over a decade to develop.  I say it that way to make us think.  A case in point without much personal input is my experience with my father.  He had great RESPECT and love for the Jewish people and it is here where I attribute my ‘nascent Zionism.’  Guess what?  I know my dad was not anti-Jew, but was his theology?  In unpacking some dispensational thought Hennessy reasons

Darby, who is known as the “father of dispensationalism,” believed God has dealt with mankind in different ways in different ages or “dispensations.” Christians belong to the latest dispensation, an age of grace, and are considered God’s “heavenly people.” But the descendants of Abraham – at least those who came before Jesus, plus those who didn’t accept Him as Messiah after He came – belonged to the dispensation of Law and are God’s “earthly people.” The only exception to this rule are Jews who do believe in Jesus. They are counted as part of the Church and those alive at Jesus return can get on the rapture “bus.”

Although he taught that the Church and Israel would always remain separate and distinct, he believed both groups play parallel roles in God’s plan of salvation. And will receive parallel inheritances. That is, he didn’t teach that the Jews had been disenfranchised by the Church, as Replacement Theology taught. But he didn’t see the Church as being a continuation or enhancement of Israel, either.

 

So maybe I can get my dad off the hook by this logic, but how about those who do not believe in dispensationalism but still have the vestige of a sudden rapture, leaving unsaved Israel behind.  If after a thorough look at Scripture you still attest to this view, then I obviously accept that and will not allow us to be divided (Psalm 133).   There was never a scientific study done on my part, but via attendance at Messianic conferences, reading Jewish leaders writings and at one time being an active member in a Messianic congregation I observed a trend that they did not ascribe to this view.

In a recent interview of Ron Cantor, an Israeli believer, on Line of Fire radio, host Dr. Michael Brown briefly discusses this issue.  Cantor states that most Messianic believers , IN ISRAEL, hold to a post-Tribulation paradigm.   (Conversation starts at approximately the 30 minute mark, emphasis mine).  This corroborates my experience.

The point here is to help define the relationship of the Church to Israel and clarify the roles of Jew (even unsaved) and gentile believer.  Also, how do you daily LIVE your life thinking “Any minute I am out of here.”  As opposed to preparing your life knowing you (the Church)  are required to live through Israel’s ‘darkest hour’ for a divine purpose and witness.

So coming into focus the question is “What does it say to the unsaved Jewish person, when we sincerely want them to see the reflection of Messiah in our life, if we hold to this escapist mentality?”  Once again the thoughts of Brian Hennessy:

Therefore, if we are going to be solidly in Israel’s corner as we promised, we can’t also be planning for an early exit. Their fight is also our fight. We must come alongside them, not just as fans, but as family. It doesn’t matter that the majority of Jews do not recognize us or accept us yet as mishpochah. We know it is true! Therefore we have to act in faith and believe we have a stake in this game. The blessings of Israel are something we too will share in if we faint not.

But if we only rejoice over the reestablishment of Israel because it is a prophetic sign that Jesus is coming soon. Or because it is merely an encouragement that if God is faithful to them He’ll be faithful to us. Or because it shows we now reject Replacement Theology, even though we still hold fast to Darby’s Separation Theology – then our Zionism is indeed a hollow shell.

No, we must be in this for the long haul. We must be one with the Jews, come what may, and trust we will rejoice with them at the glorious deliverance our God has promised to perform for us. “For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for your welfare and not for calamity; to give you a hope and a future” (Jer. 29:11).

 

 

John Paul is is an Associate Editor for Voice of Revolution, overseeing Jewish Issues.
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