November 16th, 2009 by M. French

The Alliance Defense Fund is urging that Fort Hood Terrorist Nidal Malik Hasan be charged with 14 counts of murder, rather than the 13 he’s currently charged with. Who is this 14th victim? The unborn child of Private Francheska Velez. According to the ADF:

The Alliance Defense Fund issued a letter Thursday to the Office of Staff Judge Advocate at Fort Hood, Texas, urging it to enforce the law by charging the suspect in the Fort Hood massacre with the killing of all 14 of the dead victims in the Fort Hood massacre, including the pre-born child of Private Francheska Velez.

“All murder victims–born and pre-born–deserve equal justice,” said ADF Senior Legal Counsel Steven H. Aden. “Women who volunteer to protect our country deserve to know that the government will enforce the laws that protect their children.”

Military prosecutors have charged Maj. Nadil Malik Hasan with 13 counts of premeditated murder after last week’s shooting at Fort Hood but have not yet charged him with the death of Velez’s child, being referred to as “Baby Velez.” Army officials have indicated that additional charges against Hasan are under consideration.

The ADF letter urges enforcement of Article 119a of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, which makes it a crime for anyone “to cause the death…of a child, who is in utero at the time the conduct takes place” regardless of whether the killer intended to kill the child. If the killer intended to kill the child, he can be prosecuted for murder under Article 118.

“According to press accounts, Private Velez had returned to America from Iraq a week before the shooting,” the letter states. “Private Velez was three months pregnant and was excited about being a new mother. She was scheduled to begin maternity leave next month. She was filling out paperwork relating to her pregnancy when she and her child were killed… It would cause a severe and negative impact on morale if Army women were made to believe that the Army valued their children less than they did adult victims of crime. We respectfully request that you enforce UCMJ Article 119a against the suspect.”

According to the letter:

The Uniform Code of Military Justice, Article 119a, makes it a crime for anyone to “cause[] the death of.. a child, who is in urtero at the time the conduct takes place,”while he is committing conduct that constitutes murder of the child’s mother under Article 118 (or while committing any of server other offenses against persons). Culpability under 119a explicitly does not require that Maj. Hasan knew about Pvt. Velez’s unborn child; but if he intended to kill the child, the law requires that he be prosecuted under Article 118 for murder of the child.

Notwithstanding the incredible hypocrisy of a government that protects a mother’s right to murder their infant while prosecuting the same murder when someone else is at fault, we are in full support of ADF’s stance and hope to see justice done in the case of Pvt. Velez’s child.

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September 19th, 2009 by M. French

On August 4th, 2009, George Sodini walked into a fitness center near Pittsburgh, PA and shot 12 people. Three women were killed, and Mr. Sodini himself committed suicide. The day before the murder-suicide, Mr. Sordoni wrote that he was going to “see God and Jesus” soon on his blog, saying:

Maybe soon, I will see God and Jesus. At least that is what I was told. Eternal life does NOT depend on works. If it did, we will all be in hell. Christ paid for EVERY sin, so how can I or you be judged BY GOD for a sin when the penalty was ALREADY paid. People judge but that does not matter. I was reading the Bible and The Integrity of God beginning yesterday, because soon I will see them.

The day after the shootings, Dr. Brown addressed the murder and these words on his Line of Fire radio show (the show is appropriately titled “A Once Saved Always Saved Murder?”).  The audio is below, and provides a good overview of the situation and the doctrine in question:

Evidently, the gunman had been taught that because he had prayed a prayer asking Jesus into his heart at some point in his life, he would spend eternity in heaven with God, no matter what sins he committed or beliefs he espoused thereafter. Here are some thoughts on the subject I put together in an email shortly after the killings took place, and the news came out concerning the gunmen’s beliefs. I submit them for consideration:


I would venture to say that our life and faith in Messiah is in reality more about an organic, somewhat mysterious spiritual dynamic, than a doctrinal system that has as the main goal avoiding the bad place and going to the nice place upon death.

Of interest may be Richard Dawkins’ article after 9/11 that I reference in my Atheism article: where he says: “religion teaches the dangerous nonsense that death is not the end.”

Of course, his thesis has major problems philosophically (does not atheism teach the dangerous nonsense that our only punishment and reward are in this life?), but I actually AGREE with him that false and untrue religion is quite dangerous, and for people to blindly believe that they’re going to heaven the second they die, without feeling the need to have a bit of evidence that it’s true beyond the words of a religious teacher, is quite dangerous as well as perhaps a bit crazy.

But then, if as so many believe, we don’t need the tangible, objective, supernatural presence of God, nor as Mark Galli writes, any real difference at all in our lives from non-believers, to know that our particular doctrinal system is absolutely true, why should we expect people to not “misuse” a doctrine such as once-saved-always-saved, or believe a false religion like Islam? They believe what they believe for the same reasons we do, and with the same level of certainty.

All this to say, I wonder if the problem with this shooter was both an unbiblical belief and blindly believing something with no tangible evidence. Perhaps in his case a healthy fear of death and the judgment to come was in order, as well as a healthy skepticism.

Consider this:

If we require nothing of our religion, why should we expect our religion to require anything of us?

Is it any wonder that those of us in the Kingdom of God that are living and dying for the advancement of the gospel, spiritual revival, cultural reformation, and an increased depth in the Church find it so difficult to awake this “sleeping giant” (as Leonard Ravenhill called it), when so many of us in the Church require nothing of our beliefs beyond simply hearing them preached from a pulpit or reading them in a book?

Until men and women start taking seriously the question of why they believe what they believe, not only will they continue to subconsciously resist the leaven of the gospel from infecting their entire lives, but dangerous doctrines will continue to abound.

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