July 18th, 2012 by Christine Colbert

Who has heard such a thing? Who has ever seen such things? Can a country be born in a day or a nation be brought forth in a moment? Yet no sooner is Zion in labor than she gives birth to her children. (Isaiah 66:8)

 

This is what the Lord God says: Look, I will lift up My hand to the nations, and raise My banner to the peoples. They will bring your sons in their arms,
 and your daughters will be carried on their shoulders. (Isaiah 49:22)

 

They will bring all your brothers from all the nations as a gift to the Lord on horses and chariots, in litters, and on mules and camels, to My holy mountain Jerusalem,” says the Lord, “just as the Israelites bring an offering in a clean vessel to the house of the Lord.” (Isaiah 66:20)

 

“However, take note! The days are coming”—the Lord’s declaration—“when it will no longer be said, ‘As the Lord lives who brought the Israelites from the land of Egypt,’ but rather, ‘As the Lord lives who brought the Israelis from the land of the north and from all the other lands where He had banished them.’ For I will return them to their land that I gave to their ancestors.” (Jeremiah 16:14,15)

 

“ . . . the nations will know that I am the Lord.  For I will gather you up from all the nations and bring you home again to your land.” (Ezekiel 36:23,24)

 

Rabbi Shmuley Boteach appeared recently on a Sid Roth television debate with Dr. Brown (Viewable at: http://www.sidroth.org/site/News2?news_iv_ctrl=-1&abbr=tv_&page=NewsArticle&id=11373&security=1041).

Shmuley recited a list of reasons that Jesus “can’t” be the Jewish Messiah that was, to say the least, less than persuasive. One of his “reasons” seemed particularly strange; Shmuley cited the “unfulfilled” Messianic prophecy that Israel’s Messiah would “restore the kingdom to Israel.” He asked, with his characteristically-intense, rising volume, pitch, and speed, whether anyone thought this prophecy has been fulfilled.

Surely Shmuley is aware of the massive return to Israel in recent decades of people of Jewish ancestry from Russia, Africa, the U.S., and other parts of the world. Christians (and perhaps other people of faith from around the world) have financially supported the return of those who couldn’t have “made aliyah” otherwise. Even if Shmuley refers to the restoration of military power and superiority to Israel, rather than the restoration of its lost tribes and scattered citizenry, these military objectives have also been accomplished by tiny Israel in recent decades!

Yes, Rabbi Shmuley, many viewers are absolutely certain that these amazing prophecies have been — and are still being — fulfilled before our eyes.

The prophetic verses above (and there are many more on this topic) become so powerful and precious in light of recent history, with regard to the return of the lost tribes or scattered citizenry of Israel. But the statement at the end of Isaiah 66:20, which is about Israel’s children being brought back to her in every possible type of conveyance, is deeply intriguing:  “as the Israelites bring an offering in a clean vessel to the house of the Lord.”

Could the “clean vessel” be a new Israel (“Messianic” Israelis), whose citizens’ eyes will increasingly be freed from the “scales” that have blinded them (also foretold in prophecy), and whose people will at long last see the One who has so long been obscured from her understanding and recognition — and finally requite to the Lord the offering of love and recognition that He so richly deserves?

May it increasingly come into manifestation before all rejoicing hearts. Maranatha!

Posted in Israel & The Jewish People Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

May 9th, 2011 by M. French

Video comp of message by Bob Gladstone:


[Link to Video]

“…stop doing things in a human way…”

Posted in The Kingdom of God Tagged with: , , ,

April 2nd, 2011 by Eric Gilmour


[Link to Video]

Posted in Featured Articles, Revival & Prayer Tagged with: , , , , , ,

March 30th, 2011 by Christine Colbert

Hussein “Steve” Mashni is a Palestinian Arab who has published the website jesusdied4mohamed2.com, as well as authoring books and other content.

Mashni grew up in America in a home with a Muslim father and a Catholic mother. He says that his mother wasn’t religious, so the Muslim culture was emphasized in his home. He was devout even as a child, and as he grew older he pleaded with “Allah” to show up in a way that he could comprehend. Nothing happened, and this was of great concern to Mashni.

In a recent interview he said that as a teenager he was watching an Oral Roberts event on television. He said that suddenly he knew beyond a doubt that Jesus was right in the same room with him, “that He is the Son of God, and that He is Messiah.” These perceptions are in direct opposition to tenets of his Muslim upbringing.

Like other former Muslims who are finding the courage to “come out” with their stories of finding Christ — or more accurately, as in Mashni’s case — with their accounts of Jesus’ coming or appearing to them, Mashni’s conversion was not without difficulty. His life was never the same after his conversion experience.

As we listened to him describe his experiences and perceptions about Arab nations, we were increasingly convinced of his sincerity and devotion.

We visited Israel last year. It is an exceedingly precious Land. Our guide talked with us about the antagonistic graffiti we saw in some of the Palestinian Arab communities. Antagonistic toward Israel, of course.

He said that it’s all about “a kind of one-upmanship” or rivalry.

As we read Scripture with its prophecy about the nations that will “come against Israel” in latter days that is being fulfilled before our eyes, the ugliness of this rivalry and its most appalling manifestation in acts of suicidal terror, often on the parts of young men — and even women — came to mind.

But Mashni has opened our eyes to a new perspective on the Arab experience.

Most of us know the remarkable ancient story of Abraham and Sarah, Hagar, Ishmael, and Isaac.

Mashni says that the pain of Ishmael — of being sent out of his father’s house — is still the source of deep “woundedness” in Ishmael’s Arab descendants today.

Mashni says this deep cultural wound “creates anger and jealousy,” — and that we see this borne out in Arab cultures.

But Mashni reminds us that just as in the old scriptural story God continued to care for and about Ishmael and his mother — Jesus is appearing to many Muslims today and working to heal this woundedness of the Arab people, whose forefather Ishmael was so painfully close to those who were “chosen” to be the forebears of the Messiah — even living under the same roof with them! — yet he, and through him the Arab people — were not the chosen!

Increasingly reports are coming in about people throughout the Arab world having dreams and visions of One they often describe as “the man in white.”

As we come to more fully understand a primary cause of the longstanding strife in this area from Mashni’s personal experience and perceptions, this fuller understanding motivates us to continue praying and working for the end of all division between the Arab and Israeli cultures and the increasing presence of the “one new man” (or humanity) in Messiah that Ephesians 2:15 foretells.

 

Christine Colbert is a writer and editorial consultant, and is part of Or HaOlam Messianic Congregation in Overland Park.

Posted in Featured Articles, Islam & The Middle East Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

February 15th, 2011 by David Harwood

I was teaching two classes in Manhattan, one on Philippians (as a window into Pauline theology) and the other on God’s love. What I taught on God’s love was apparently irrelevant to one student until we happened upon this verse in the Philippians class:

For God is my witness, how I long for you all with the affection of [Messiah] Jesus. (Philippians 1:8)

Suddenly, the eyes of her heart opened to the nature of God’s love. Ever since, this has been one of my favorite verses.

The Vocabulary:

The most important words from this verse for this exhortation are “long” and “affection.”

Quickly, epipotheo, translated “long for,” means “to pursue with love, to long after.” (Thayer’s Greek Lexicon)

The word translated “affection” is one of those messy words having to do with internal organs, in this case, the intestines. At the risk of a bad pun, let’s mention that applying this to the transcendent and glorified Son of God is “gutsy.” It is not the well thought out concept of a theologian. Instead, it is a word (splangchna) which indicates feeling. This word describes a “visceral” emotion. It is often translated, “compassion.” Louw-Nida (a lexicon used in translation work) puts it like this: the deep, inner seat of tender emotions in the whole personality. That works for me.

Longing for You with Jesus’ Affection

Now, it seems that there are a few possible explanations for this radical expression. If I’ve left something out, please write me and let me know. Meanwhile, let’s take a look at some of our options…

Maybe Paul’s reference to the Messiah’s affection is about his experience of something alien to his own soul. A temple is not the same thing as the God who indwells it. Was he perhaps like a temple and Jesus’ affections like the manifest presence shining from a human holy of holies? Was he, perhaps, like a riverbed and the affections of Jesus, the river?

“Philippians, I am experiencing something that is way more than I could ever have in and of myself. I am experiencing Jesus’ own longing and affection towards you.”

Was Paul overwhelmed by Jesus’ affection, similar to a revival phenomenon of spiritual inebriation? Was this like experiencing a flame of fire, burning over him, which had no relationship to the apostle at all? (Acts 2:3) Sort of like a burning candle? The candle is not the flame.

“Brothers and sisters, I am experiencing the Messiah’s affections for you, not my own.”

Is it possible that this was a spiritual enhancement of Paul’s human affection? Is this a description of Paul and the Messiah’s spirits being united? After all, “he who is joined to the Lord becomes one spirit with him.” (1 Corinthians 6:17) Is this what the apostle meant?

“My affection for you is like a glove and the fullness of this longing and affection I have for you is like the hand in the glove.”

Orthodox Churches have a doctrine of sanctification called “theosis.” They explain that a sword in a fire ends up with similar qualities, yet remains a sword. So the human soul which abides in the Lord “may become partakers of the divine nature.” (2 Peter 1:4b) I think of it more like a carton of milk being put in a refrigerator – it eventually shares the same temperature.

“My soul has been in communion with the Son of God so intensely that I have come to share His affection for you. My affection is like His because of His presence in my life.”

Or perhaps it has to do with the quality of Paul’s sanctified and empowered emotional attachment. (Romans 5:3; Galatians 5:22-24) Paul might be saying,

“My longing and affection for you is just like the longing and affection of Jesus. When you experience my longing and affection, you are experiencing that which is analogous (just like) to the Son of God’s heart for you.”

At the risk of wearing you out, we’ll stop exploring these possibilities. One way or the other, Paul is saying something he expected believers to believe: Jesus longs for them; Jesus is affectionate towards them.

Whole, Full, Powerful Longing

It is important to know that the Lord’s emotional life is whole, full, and powerful. This includes “longing” as well as “affection.”

In this instance, Paul is connecting to, and conveying, an emotion which we call “missing.” The reason someone longs for something, or someone, is a sense of incompleteness. When you miss something, or someone, you have a longing – which can become a pining. Paul wasn’t pining away for the Philippians, he was oriented towards knowing Jesus, but in the depths of his heart he longed to see them. Isn’t it amazing that this emotion is paralleled by Jesus’ heart towards us?

“Longing with affection” feels similar to homesickness. Doug Collins, a chaplain in Iraq, wrote (in the Gainesville Gazette, 11/14/08), “…homesickness. It is probably the No. 1 (sic) issue that I deal with here. Homesickness also is the hardest thing to deal with … I have nothing that can take away the longing in the heart to be at home with family and friends…”

In Light of This

There is warmth radiating from this verse that can provide comfort and reassurance. To think that the Lord’s heart is affectionate towards these believers provides emotional and spiritual security. These Philippians weren’t perfect. They had problems with pride and schism which provoked apostolic adjustment. Yet, they warranted affection from the Lord – as do you. Jesus thinks of you with affection; you stir His emotions in the direction of loving affection. He enjoys your company and longs to be with you. In his emotional motivations towards the Philippians, Paul was like Jesus.

In the light of this, let’s close this meditation with Paul’s prayer found in the next verse:

it is my prayer that your love may abound more and more, with knowledge and all discernment, so that you may approve what is excellent, and so be pure and blameless for the day of [the Messiah], filled with the fruit of righteousness that comes through Jesus [the Messiah], to the glory and praise of God. (Philippians 1:9-11)

 

David Harwood is a prophetic teacher and worship leader, and author of the book God’s True Love.

Posted in Featured Articles, The Kingdom of God Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,

January 11th, 2011 by M. French

One need not have special revelation or any particular spiritual belief to know that what happened in Arizona was wrong in the worst way.  We instinctively and rightly recoil from the thought of it, no matter where and how our morality is founded.  Yet whether we consciously intend to or not, we not only react with revulsion, but also a question… what does this mean?  Just as we know instinctively that it is wrong, we also know that it carries meaning.  We want and need to interpret this event and what it means in our time, as well as what our response should be.

To the New York Times’ Paul Krugman and other similarly minded thinkers, the meaning is to be found in calling out right-wing political commentators for creating a climate of “hate” towards Democrats that is so dreadful that folks like Krugman “expect[ed] something like this atrocity to happen.”  Our response to these murders, we are told, should be to call “all decent people” to “shun” the “likes of [Glenn] Beck and [Bill] O’Reilly.”

FoxNews and Drudge Report, on the other hand, seem to interpret this event as an anomaly we can safely attribute to the strange delusions of one mentally disturbed individual (while also throwing in that he was a “left-wing pothead” in order to curb the attacks coming from outlets such as the NYT).  How is one supposed to react to the “Scary Freak” shown in the screenshot below taken from the Drudge Report homepage? Obviously, the intent is to disassociate this man not only from conservatives, but seemingly from all of us! The response they are advocating seems to be a very practical one, that we should improve our governmental mental health system so that people like this are identified, hospitalized, and (perhaps) medicated before they act out in this way.

While the conservative reaction described is more to the point (and certainly better factually attested and reasoned), I believe that the liberal attempt to interpret the event as part of a larger reality is right on, even if their conclusions are not.  The NYT’s Krugman was right when he said:

It’s true that the shooter in Arizona appears to have been mentally troubled. But that doesn’t mean that his act can or should be treated as an isolated event, having nothing to do with the national climate.

Yet he was wrong in his analysis of what it is in the national climate that bred events and minds like this.  The problem goes much deeper than right-wing rhetoric aimed at the left (as an aside, it should be noted that the left is often as bad as or worse than the right in their demonizing of the opposition, as discussed on yesterday’s Line of Fire episode). In fact, it goes much deeper than the New York Times, or FoxNews, or the Drudge Report are willing (or trained) to go.  Krugman is right that there is “sickness” permeating our society, but the sickness is not only in “them” (to Krugman, the right), and it is not only in “him” (to Drudge, the shooter). No, the sickness is in us, all of us!

The nation’s sickness is an evil more real and devastating than any of us realize, and when events such as what happened in Arizona occur, we must discern that rather than some anomaly perpetuated by one angry or disturbed soul so utterly different from the rest of us (some “Scary Freak”),  this evil is a public manifestation of a larger reality. We are in a sin-sick society that has cultivated a loveless, godless, and purposeless culture that provides its youth with precious little reason to live beyond the pursuit of immediate pleasure and the numbing of one’s pain.  Is it any wonder that it is in the midst of this sort of environment we find young men that for whatever reason (be it mental instability, social rejection, or beliefs/ideologies) are neither enticed by the allure of pleasure, comfort, or societal status, nor intimidated by the punishments that can be leveled upon them by society’s social and governmental structures, turning their inward rage and hostility outward?  While we ought to be shocked by this act, we ought not be shocked that a deluded young man living a meaningless, purposeless life in a meaningless, purposeless society, committed an act of meaningless, purposeless violence.

In addition to the immediate, visceral, and pragmatic response we should have to a tragedy such as this, there is a deeper reality we need to enter into in order to extract the meaning of something of this horror.  What is the meaning of this tragedy? And what should our response be? Whatever the specifics of this particular case may end up being, and to whatever extent Jared Loughner was affected or unaffected by this age in the midst of his apparent delusions, I would submit that to look into the face of the “scary freak” pictured on Drudge above, or at the pictures of Virginia Tech shooter Seng Hui-Cho or Columbine killers Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold below, and look away without sensing a need to desperately change the culture we’ve nurtured is to see but not understand, to hear but not perceive. These were not individuals motivated by greed, or ideology, or so many other things that make (at some level) sense to us. There’s something desperate, something pathetic in their lives and actions.

There’s a deeper response called for, and it starts with a call for all of us to repent before the living God for cultivating the culture we abide in, asking the author of life to change us from those that sit idly by as generation after generation comes through the societal “system” we’ve set up without having any sense of meaning and purpose beyond the things of this world. There is a stream of true life available to all, and we must be ones that testify to its reality in our generation. We must be the “salt-seasoning” of our society, with a “saltiness” born from deep and real encounters with the Messiah. “The heavens are the heavens of the Lord, but the earth He has given to the sons of men.” This is our divine responsibility… let’s not miss this.

Posted in Culture, Featured Articles, News Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

November 1st, 2010 by M. French

From the AskDrBrown E-Newsletter Archive:

Be sure to tune in to this lively and informative debate, as Dr. James White and I debate the deity of Jesus and God’s tri-unity with Sir Anthony Buzzard and Mr. Joseph Good on Jonathan Bernis’s Jewish Voice Broadcast, airing on major Christian TV networks from Nov. 1-14 (a different segment of the debate will air each week). You don’t want to miss these lively and highly informative debates! For TV listings, or to watch online once the shows air, go HERE.

You can watch by clicking here and searching for programs labeled “The Deity of Messiah”.

Posted in News, Philosophy & Science Tagged with: , , , , , ,

August 15th, 2010 by M. French

Can a Jew Believe in Jesus?

Rabbi Shmuley vs Dr. Michael Brown

Debate after the 2010 National Apologetics Conference

October 15-16 Charlotte, NC

Michael Brown Rabbi Shmuley

Dr. Michael Brown vs          Rabbi Shmuley Boteach

Rabbi Shmuley Boteach is considered “the most famous rabbi in America” by Newsweek magazine and is the international best-selling author of 23 books. He has appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show, was a spiritual adviser to Michael Jackson, and has his own take on spirituality and religion (see biography here).

As a Jewish believer in Jesus, Dr. Michael Brown is active in Jewish evangelism, debating rabbis on radio, TV, and college campuses. He is a radio show host, author, seminary professor, and ministry leader. He holds a Ph.D. in Near Eastern Languages and Literature from New York University (see biography here)

Join us for a stimulating debate on issues of Jesus, Judaism, Christianity, and religion.

[CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION]

Posted in Israel & The Jewish People, News Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,

October 10th, 2009 by M. French

It’s John Lennon’s birthday today, and as often happens with figures like Lennon, discussion on the meaning of his life and legacy is coming forth. Who was he? A pop artist? A product of marketing geniuses? A lost soul in need of boundaries and structure? Perhaps he was many of these things, but I think a keen insight into who he really was came in an interview in which he was asked whether his songs “Give Peace a Chance” and “Power to the People” were propaganda songs. His reply was, “Sure. So was ‘All You Need Is Love’. I’m a revolutionary artist. My art is dedicated to change.”

True, the change he was seeking was at best insufficient, and at worst destructive, but one can’t help but respect that he saw himself, in the end, as a “revolutionary artist.” This brings up the question though, if John Lennon was attempting to change the world through art with his human-inspired message, where are the revolutionary artists in the Kingdom of God who will change the world with their God-inspired message? Who is going beyond simply writing nice worship songs, and creating music that will change and inspire an entire generation to unashamedly follow the Messiah and love God with all their being?

With this question in mind, here are are a list of my top 3 Jesus propaganda songs. These are songs that have gone beyond being “nice” Christian songs, and have attempted to do something more. One strips, one convicts, and the other ignites. May they inspire the budding revolutionary artists in our midst to affect change through their chosen mediums:

3. How He Loves – John Mark McMillan

Something of a departure from the other songs on this list, while still being propaganda in a similar vein to John Lennon’s “All You Need is Love,” “How He Loves” has become more anthem than song, and is some of the rawest music you’ll ever hear. Written the day after John Mark McMillan’s best friend died in a car-wreck, it provides verses that strip you of all your defenses, and resolves in a chorus that lifts you into a place that would seem too good to be true, if not for the deep abiding knowledge that it is perhaps the truest statement you’ve ever heard (the chorus stands alone as one of only two or three I never tire of singing). “How he loves us, oh, how he loves us.”

And for everyone that has issues with the lyric “heaven meets earth like a sloppy wet kiss” (David Crowder changed this lyric on his cover of the song), don’t worry, this lyric is not about tongue-kissing God, it’s about the realm of heaven meeting the realm of earth, with the result being something that is both beautiful and messy (and what’s messier than a sloppy wet kiss?). John Mark discusses this lyric and how people reacted to David Crowder changing it on his blog:

Some folks are genuinely sad because a song so personal to them seems to have been messed with, and others seem to be glad that you can now sing this song in church with your grandparents. I understand both of those sentiments, and don’t have an issue with either. Still many of the people, on both ends, who seem to be making a big deal out of it, have both seemed to misunderstand the lyric. It seems that people either hate it or love it because they think I’m some how talking about kissing God. Please folks, I never ever, ever, ever, thought of this line as though it was talking about kissing God. Please read the words.

“HEAVEN meets EARTH like a sloppy wet kiss”

The idea behind the lyric is that the kingdom of heaven and the kingdom of earth converge in a way that is both beautiful and awkwardly messy. Think about the birth of a child, or even the death of Jesus himself. These miracles are both incredibly beautiful and incredibly sloppy (“gory” may be more realistic, but “Heaven meets earth like a gory mess” didn’t seem to have the same ring). Why does the church have such a problem with things being sloppy? Do we really think we’re fooling anyone on Sunday morning, especially God? Are we going to offend him? I mean, he’s seen us naked in the shower all week and knows our worst thoughts, and still thinks we’re awesome. What if we took all the energy we spent faking and used that energy to enjoy the Lord instead? That could be revolutionary!

Revolutionary indeed. The video below is from The Call: Nashville, and begins with John Mark talking about what inspired the song.

[Link to Video]

He is jealous for me
Loves like a hurricane, I am a tree
Bending beneath the weight of His wind and mercy
When all of a sudden, I am unaware of these afflictions eclipsed by glory
And I realize just how beautiful You are and how great your affections are for me.

Oh, how He loves us so
Oh, how He loves us
How He loves us so.

Yeah, He loves us
Woah, how He loves us
Woah, how He loves us
Woah, how He loves.

So we are His portion and He is our prize,
Drawn to redemption by the grace in His eyes
If grace is an ocean we’re all sinking
So heaven meets earth like a sloppy wet kiss and my heart turns violently inside of my chest
And I don’t have time to maintain these regrets when I think about the way

That he loves us,
Woah, how He loves us
Woah, how He loves us
Woah, how He loves

2. Send the Fire – William Booth

Will­iam Booth published this hymn in the Sal­va­tion Ar­my’s War Cry hymnal in 1894. This song delivers a cry for God to send the fire of the Holy Spirit into our lives that we might wreck the world for the glory of the Messiah. When the fire comes, the lyrics declare, “every trace of sin” will be burned up, we will “live a dying world to save,” and the revolution will “now begin.” Lord, send the fire! The video below is a rendition of the song performed by Lindell Cooley at The Call: Nashville.

[Link to Video]

Thou Christ of burning, cleansing flame,
Send the fire, send the fire, send the fire!
Thy blood bought gift today we claim,
Send the fire, send the fire, send the fire!
Look down and see this waiting host,
Give us the promised Holy Ghost;
We want another Pentecost,
Send the fire, send the fire, send the fire!

God of Elijah, hear our cry:
Send the fire, send the fire, send the fire!
To make us fit to live or die,
Send the fire, send the fire, send the fire!
To burn up every trace of sin,
To bring the light and glory in,
The revolution now begin,
Send the fire, send the fire, send the fire!

’Tis fire we want, for fire we plead,
Send the fire, send the fire, send the fire!
The fire will meet our every need,
Send the fire, send the fire, send the fire!
For strength to ever do the right,
For grace to conquer in the fight,
For power to walk the world in white,
Send the fire, send the fire, send the fire!

To make our weak hearts strong and brave,
Send the fire, send the fire, send the fire!
To live a dying world to save,
Send the fire, send the fire, send the fire!
O see us on Thy altar lay
Our lives, our all, this very day;
To crown the offering now we pray,
Send the fire, send the fire, send the fire!

1. Asleep in the Light – Keith Green

Where to begin with this song? I remember first reading some of the lyrics of this song and wondering with amazement that such a song had ever existed. Where did it come from? All I had heard up to that point in my life as a believer were songs that, while true as far as things went, never seemed to really inspire or convict me. “All this and heaven, too?” seemed to be as deep as most of the songs I played as a worship leader or listened to on Christian radio would go. But this… this was a song that pierced my heart and shook me up. “The world is sleeping in the dark, That the church can’t fight, cause it’s asleep in the light.” Yes, this song was right! Yet I’d never heard anyone in the church say it, let alone a musician. “God’s calling and you’re the one, but like Jonah you run, He’s told you to speak, but you keep holding it in.” This is what I did. This is what my friends did. Yes, yes, yes! This is me!

After searching for this mysterious musician online, I was saddened to learn that the musician I’d been waiting for since I’d been saved had been dead for 20 years! Oh, how deflating that was. Still, his music speaks even from his grave. Lovely sweet positive music this is not. It’s real and devastating, yet hopeful in the midst of its honesty, and by the end of the song you’re not singing about how much more committed and devoted you will be to God, you are singing about “coming away” with Jesus. Honestly coming before the Master and exposing to him your compromise, fear, and selfishness, and embracing his power and passion to live an internally consistent, Jesus-exalting existence. This is the answer to the dilemma posed by the song. “Come away, from this mess, come away with Me, My love.”

[Link to Video]

Do you see, do you see, all the people sinking down,
Don’t you care, don’t you care, are you gonna let them drown,
How can you be so numb, not to care if they come,
You close your eyes and pretend the job’s done.

Oh Bless me Lord, bless me Lord, you know it’s all I ever hear,
No one aches, no one hurts, no one even sheds one tear,
But He cries, He weeps, He bleeds, and He cares for your needs,
And you just lay back and keep soaking it in, oh, can’t you see it’s such sin?
Cause He brings people to your door,
And you turn them away, as you smile and say,

God bless you, be at peace, and all Heaven just weeps,
Cause Jesus came to your door, you’ve left Him out on the streets.

Open up, open up, and give yourself away,
You’ve seen the need, you hear the cry, so how can you delay,
God’s calling and you’re the one, but like Jonah you run,
He’s told you to speak, but you keep holding it in,
Oh, can’t you see it’s such sin?

The world is sleeping in the dark,
That the church can’t fight, cause it’s asleep in the light,
How can you be so dead, when you’ve been so well fed,
Jesus rose from the grave, and you, you can’t even get out of bed,
Oh, Jesus rose from the dead, come on, get out of your bed.

How can you be so numb, not to care if they come,
You close your eyes and pretend the job’s done,
You close your eyes and pretend the job’s done,
Don’t close your eyes, don’t pretend the job’s done.
Come away, come away, come away with Me, My love,
Come away, from this mess, come away with Me, My love.

Posted in News, Revolution & Justice Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,